Drupal blog posts http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog en Using Shopify for Online Business http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/using-shopify-for-online-business <span class="field field-node--title field-name-title field-type-string field-label-hidden">Using Shopify for Online Business</span> <span class="field field-node--uid field-name-uid field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sheryl</span></span> <span class="field field-node--created field-name-created field-type-created field-label-hidden">Thu, 08/03/2017 - 16:06</span> <div class="clearfix field field-node--body field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><p><strong>Why use Shopify for selling your products online?</strong></p> <p>We have assisted in the process of customers transitioning to <a href="http://www.shopify.ca" target="_blank">Shopify</a> stores. Some customers had brick and mortar shops, while others were using websites with integrated eCommerce. These customers were looking for a way to customize their stores while decreasing the amount of time required to continually make complicated updates required by payment processors.</p> <p><strong>How does Shopify work?</strong></p> <p>Shopify provides an integrated solution - simply choose a monthly fee based on how many products you will sell, select a theme, add your products and begin selling. The user-friendly interface allows for plugins to be easily installed. Payment processing and updates are made automatically, leaving more time to focus on sales and customer service.</p> <p><strong>What types of businesses use Shopify?</strong></p> <p>Shopify is targeted toward small to medium businesses.</p> <p>To see an example of a store which has operated seamlessly since 2010, visit the Italian Motors USA online kart shop at <a href="https://italianmotorsusa.myshopify.com/" target="_blank">https://italianmotorsusa.myshopify.com/</a></p> <p><strong>Can I use social media to sell my products?</strong></p> <p>Shopify offers multiple solutions, including sales using a Facebook page or Messenger. Shopify also offers online stores, Point of Sale and a Buy button.</p> <p>More perks? Shopify is a 100% Canadian business and offers a free 14 day trial.</p> <p><a href="http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/contact">Ask us what Shopify can do to improve online business</a></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-node--field-blog-tags field-name-field-blog-tags field-type-entity-reference field-label-above"> <div class="field-label">Blog tags</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/86" hreflang="en">Shopify</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/44" hreflang="en">eCommerce</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/87" hreflang="en">Canadian</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/37" hreflang="en">small business</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/88" hreflang="en">Italian Motors USA</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 03 Aug 2017 23:06:57 +0000 Sheryl 117 at http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com Five Reasons to Choose Google Apps for Business http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/five-reasons-to-choose-google-apps-business <span class="field field-node--title field-name-title field-type-string field-label-hidden">Five Reasons to Choose Google Apps for Business</span> <span class="field field-node--uid field-name-uid field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sheryl</span></span> <span class="field field-node--created field-name-created field-type-created field-label-hidden">Thu, 06/26/2014 - 15:41</span> <div class="clearfix field field-node--body field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><p dir="ltr">1) Email - 30GB of storage per user, spam filtering. Never lose an email again and access from any mobile device.</p> <p>2) Collaborative Tools and Apps - Calendar, Drive, Sites, Marketplace Apps such as Insightly Project/Task Management, Groups, Hangouts (instant messaging).</p> <p>3) Store in and work in the cloud - simplify team efforts on documents and more.</p> <p>4) Reliability - 99.9% uptime.</p> <p>5) Quick to set up - minimal to no interruption in service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-node--field-blog-tags field-name-field-blog-tags field-type-entity-reference field-label-above"> <div class="field-label">Blog tags</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/58" hreflang="en">blog</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/37" hreflang="en">small business</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">email</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/29" hreflang="en">Google</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/67" hreflang="en">mobile</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/84" hreflang="en">reliability</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 26 Jun 2014 22:41:57 +0000 Sheryl 116 at http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com Managing Shared Tasks and To-Do Lists http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/managing-shared-tasks-to-do-lists <span class="field field-node--title field-name-title field-type-string field-label-hidden">Managing Shared Tasks and To-Do Lists</span> <span class="field field-node--uid field-name-uid field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sheryl</span></span> <span class="field field-node--created field-name-created field-type-created field-label-hidden">Thu, 01/16/2014 - 23:42</span> <div class="clearfix field field-node--body field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><p dir="ltr">I was having a discussion with Dave, who has expertise in <a href="http://intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog">keeping data secure in the cloud</a>. We were trying to figure out what works best for sharing tasks/to-do lists in professional/personal circumstances, as this type of information is also stored in the cloud. Turns out we use a lot of the same ones in similar ways.</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="http://docs.google.com/"><strong>Google Docs</strong></a></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>SS </em>- Awesome for sharing, great integration with Insightly, Google Drive is great too as the documents are then synced to whichever devices you use. Plus, guess how Dave and I collaborated on this post?</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>DW </em>- Great for on the go spreadsheets or docs. Makes a great shared Christmas shopping list complete with running totals that you and your significant other can update from any device in real time as you shop.</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://www.evernote.com/"><strong>Evernote</strong></a></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>DW </em>- The new indispensable business tool.  Seems to be the corporate standard for converting to a tablet from paper notebooks.  Not only can I take notes but I can take photos of whiteboard sessions or record voice presentations.  Now I can search all my meeting notes instead of flipping page by page through multiple paper notebooks.  All this can be tagged per customer and/or project.  Plus I can access from my laptop, tablet and phone or in a pinch from the web wherever I am.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>SS</em> - A catchall for lists, notes, articles to snip from the web and read later, videos to watch, crafting patterns, articles your boss told you to read. Integrates with Insightly too.</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://www.wunderlist.com/"><strong>Wunderlist</strong></a></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>SS</em> - Great for lists which can be shared using the web, then are easily accessible from mobile devices. We use this to remember what we need to pick up from the store or to collaborate on the kids' activities (i.e. questions for the teacher)</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>DW</em> - Can be a great tool for multidevice and shared tasks lists. One for groceries, one for work projects to finish, one for making sure you get all your errands done on the weekend.  Check it on your phone, tablet and computer. We keep a list of groceries we need as we think of it and then round it out just before we go shop.  Helps in not missing to buy milk because you only remember when you’re not shopping.</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://www.google.com/calendar/"><strong>Google Calendar</strong></a></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>DW</em> - My wife and I have a shared calendar that we put everything we need to do in.  Birthdays, anniversaries, days off work/school, kids events (school meetings, sports practices, birthday parties), dinner parties and nights out with the guys/girls everything gets recorded and I don't forget and double-book an evening.  Saves a great deal of marital stress.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>SS</em> - Lots of features here for work or personal. Can share calendars, download other people’s calendars (i.e. hockey game schedule, work projects schedule), add items to a calendar so co-workers will see a meeting is scheduled. Love the pop-up and email reminders too.</p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="http://www.insightly.com/"><strong>Insightly</strong></a></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>SS</em> - Good for work-related tasks as they can be assigned to a project so everything is tidy in its own place. Reminders in email are helpful, as is the feature of being able to repeat a task if you don’t think you’ll get around to it that day.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>What do you use to manage shared tasks and to-dos?</em></p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-node--field-blog-tags field-name-field-blog-tags field-type-entity-reference field-label-above"> <div class="field-label">Blog tags</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/58" hreflang="en">blog</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/37" hreflang="en">small business</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/79" hreflang="en">cloud sharing</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/80" hreflang="en">collaboration</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/40" hreflang="en">computer</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/69" hreflang="en">corporate</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/81" hreflang="en">crafting</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">email</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/29" hreflang="en">Google</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/67" hreflang="en">mobile</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/82" hreflang="en">shared tasks</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/83" hreflang="en">to-do list</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 17 Jan 2014 07:42:55 +0000 Sheryl 115 at http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com Storing Data in the Cloud - Part III - Data Ownership and Summary http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/storing-data-in-cloud-data-ownership <span class="field field-node--title field-name-title field-type-string field-label-hidden">Storing Data in the Cloud - Part III - Data Ownership and Summary</span> <span class="field field-node--uid field-name-uid field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sheryl</span></span> <span class="field field-node--created field-name-created field-type-created field-label-hidden">Thu, 07/11/2013 - 16:35</span> <div class="clearfix field field-node--body field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><p>Guest post written by Dave W, Network Security Analyst.</p> <p> </p> <p>Continuing from <a href="http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/storing-data-cloud-part-i-performance-and-bandwidth">Part I about performance and bandwidth in the cloud</a> and <a href="http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/storing-data-cloud-part-ii-data-protection-resiliency-and-location">Part II about data protection, resiliency and location</a>, this post discusses data ownership and summarizes my approach to choosing a cloud service.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Data Ownership</strong></p> <p>My final item, though not by far the only other thing to think about, is data ownership. Again for the sake of argument, what happens when for whatever reason the cloud service that you are using ceases to exist? </p> <p>First, some examples of how this could happen.  It could be that the cloud provider decides that the service they are providing is no longer profitable and they decide to shut it down. It could be that the some authority hears about some illicit data on the service you are using, rightly or wrongly, and they swoop in to shut it down either temporarily or permanently.  It could be that the company goes bankrupt and the assets get liquidated to pay creditors.  There are a lot of reasons that things could get shut down and at that point the question is who does that data belong to and how do you get it back?</p> <p>It might seem obvious to you that the data is yours and should always be given back to you but that might not be the case. Most people do not read the EULA (End User Licensing Agreement) or contract that the services insist you agree to before you use their cloud.  In those documents however, are some of the details you need to know to understand this issue.  Some of the questions and answers you might have will not be in there.  At this point, once again, you might need to contact the provider and ask them. </p> <p>Data on servers or storage arrays is just data.  There will be lots of data on the infrastructure you are using from lots of individuals, companies and organizations. While the service knows whose it is when it comes to the legal owner of that data, it is still on somebody else’s computers in somebody else’s datacenter. It is up to you to understand what their policies and contracts say about what your rights are and how far they will go to enforce them.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Conclusion</strong></p> <p>Cloud services are here and they are here to stay.  You are using them now and, just as there are lot of factors to take into account when you buy a new phone, computer, car or home, there are things to consider when choosing a cloud service. Take your time, do your homework, worry about the data that is most important and relax a bit on the data that might not be as critical.  Getting paranoid about EVERY byte of data is not productive, but being more aware of what is in your data, what it might mean if you couldn’t access or what might happen if someone else accesses it is important.</p> <p>Take a look at the cloud services that are out there  - they can provide benefits to you every day.  Find them, investigate them and where it makes sense - use them. </p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-node--field-blog-tags field-name-field-blog-tags field-type-entity-reference field-label-above"> <div class="field-label">Blog tags</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/71" hreflang="en">bandwidth</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/58" hreflang="en">blog</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/72" hreflang="en">cloud data</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/73" hreflang="en">cloud storage</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/40" hreflang="en">computer</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/78" hreflang="en">data ownership</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/76" hreflang="en">data protection</a></div> </div> </div> Thu, 11 Jul 2013 23:35:59 +0000 Sheryl 114 at http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com Storing Data in the Cloud - Part II - Data Protection, Resiliency and Location http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/storing-data-in-cloud-data-protection-resiliency-location <span class="field field-node--title field-name-title field-type-string field-label-hidden">Storing Data in the Cloud - Part II - Data Protection, Resiliency and Location</span> <span class="field field-node--uid field-name-uid field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sheryl</span></span> <span class="field field-node--created field-name-created field-type-created field-label-hidden">Mon, 07/08/2013 - 08:22</span> <div class="clearfix field field-node--body field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><p>Guest post written by Dave W, Network Security Analyst.</p>&#13; &#13; <p> </p>&#13; &#13; <p>Continuing from <a href="http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/storing-data-cloud-part-i-performance-and-bandwidth">Part I of my last post about performance and bandwidth in the cloud</a>, how can I protect my data and where is it stored on the cloud?</p>&#13; &#13; <p><strong>Data Protection/Resiliency</strong></p>&#13; &#13; <p>Putting your data out into the cloud is generally a great way to protect it from the many hazards of a home or small office IT environment.  Generally, the cloud provider is going to have a nice datacenter with redundant hardware, redundant power, air conditioning, physical security, and most importantly a team of professional sysadmins and other IT pros who know how to take care of your data better than you do.  Assuming you have done your homework, this is most likely the case.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>There are still many things that can go wrong in a complex data environment and you need to know that your chosen service is prepared for this. Look at what your service says about their power, hardware, network, about cooling, physical location and staff.  Redundancy is key and the more they have the better you can sleep at night.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>Once you have found the right provider it is also important to look at what options they have for data protection and service reliability. Too often people will upload their data to the cloud and assume that that data is protected.  These are two  things that are often extras for a cloud servicer and, at minimum, they will have different options at different price points.  You need to look at both backup services and data replication/availability when you decide where to store that data. Just like at home and at the office it is imperative that your cloud data  is backed up. </p>&#13; &#13; <p>You do back up your data at home and at the office right? Of course you do! That was a silly question, back to my post.  </p>&#13; &#13; <p>So just as at home and at the office, your cloud data needs to be backed up.  If the data is itself a backup copy then you may feel safe not worrying about it being backed up again, however, if the cloud data is primary data that is the ONLY copy of that data, then you want backups.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>Many cloud services will provide backups as part of the service and you don’t need to think much about it.  Others will offer different levels of service with backup in some or all of them. When choosing a cloud service, make sure you know which option applies to you.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>Once your data is backed up you need to think about data resiliency.  Data disasters happen.  There is nothing we can do to prevent them entirely.  From sprinklers going off at the datacenter to earthquakes to somebody tripping with a cup of coffee in front of the rack with all your data in it, things can happen to the hardware that stores your data. And while we can’t prevent these from happening entirely it is important to understand what would happen to your data if this should occur.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>In some cases you can have your data replicated to a second location. In other cases the data might be backed up to tape and shipped offsite to a secure location for safekeeping. Every reputable cloud service should have a disaster recovery plan, one that is in place to get your data back to you and online and available in the event that the primary site is for some reason not available. Describing these plans would be a rather large series of articles in itself; the point, however, is that something is in place to ensure the data will still existing and be available to you in the event that the primary location of that data goes away.</p>&#13; &#13; <p> </p>&#13; &#13; <p><strong>Data Location</strong></p>&#13; &#13; <p>After you have dealt with performance aspects of locating your data somewhere else you have to look at the impact of who has access to your data.  This is a separate issue from the security conversation and is more about some interesting jurisdictional and political issues.  These can sometimes seem overly paranoid or at least extremely unlikely but if this data has any business implications they are real world concerns that you want to address.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>One of the first things to understand is where the servers your data will be living on reside.  It seems counter-intuitive to put your data into the cloud and yet be worried about where exactly it sits but there are very good reasons to do so.  For instance many industries have strong regulations on where data can be stored.  These regulations range from prohibiting data from leaving the country, province or region, to prohibiting data from being shared with certain embargoed nations for security reasons.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>While most people will see the wisdom in this for medical records or legal documents, many do not see the reasons for worrying about this for personal data.  Who cares if you store your LOL cats pics and emails from your elderly relatives on a server in another country?  This is a perfectly understandable position and one I can’t argue with but it comes down to understanding what really is in your horde of data and what the impact is if it gets seized by another government’s agency.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>Remember your data might not have anything in it that the FBI or IRS might want to see but your data is unlikely to be the only data stored at the cloud provider’s site.  If you’re a Canadian putting your personal data on an American server, as so many of us are (myself included), and somebody else stores their gambling data on those servers the authorities are not overly concerned about only impacting the gambling company and are much more likely to seize everything and ask questions later.</p>&#13; &#13; <p>If your data has any value to you make sure you think about the jurisdiction your data is being sent to and understand what that might mean.  As always when in doubt contact the service provider and ask them the tough questions.</p>&#13; </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-node--field-blog-tags field-name-field-blog-tags field-type-entity-reference field-label-above"> <div class="field-label">Blog tags</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/71" hreflang="en">bandwidth</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/37" hreflang="en">small business</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/72" hreflang="en">cloud data</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/75" hreflang="en">cloud data location</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/73" hreflang="en">cloud storage</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/76" hreflang="en">data protection</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/77" hreflang="en">data resiliency</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/41" hreflang="en">environment</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/8" hreflang="en">hardware</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/60" hreflang="en">security</a></div> </div> </div> Mon, 08 Jul 2013 15:22:16 +0000 Sheryl 113 at http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com Storing Data in the Cloud - Part I - Performance and Bandwidth http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/storing-data-in-cloud-performance-bandwidth <span class="field field-node--title field-name-title field-type-string field-label-hidden">Storing Data in the Cloud - Part I - Performance and Bandwidth</span> <span class="field field-node--uid field-name-uid field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sheryl</span></span> <span class="field field-node--created field-name-created field-type-created field-label-hidden">Thu, 07/04/2013 - 23:19</span> <div class="clearfix field field-node--body field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><p>Guest post written by Dave W, Network Security Analyst.</p> <p> </p> <p>In <a href="http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/what-consider-when-moving-cloud">my last post</a> I wrote about the security concerns when putting your data into the cloud.  In this post I am going to expand on that and get into some of the other aspects of cloud data that you need to think about. This will by no means be an exhaustive list but it should give you a few ideas.</p> <p>We are going to assume for the moment that your data has gotten to the cloud service intact and that the cloud service is fairly hardened and safe.  That being the case, there are some other things to think about.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Performance</strong></p> <p>If all your data is currently located on your computer/device or somewhere on your local network, you can get at that data with very little worry about network resources.  When your data is out on the internet somewhere things get a little bit more interesting and bandwidth starts to become an issue.  </p> <p>On a 1GigE or even 100Mbps network inside your office or home you can get data on and off your computer/device fairly quickly.  If you data is local or on directly connected external drives it might be even faster.  If your data is flying across the country or across the planet things start to slow down.  We all have to live with the limitations imposed by the speed of light.  Latency is just a reality on the internet.  If you are used to getting at that data instantly and you put it onto a cloud service, think about what that means for you and your other users.  Is it something that is going to be latency sensitive?  Is it something that is going to be really irritating or even revenue impacting if it takes a long time to retrieve?</p> <p>These are issues that you can work around.  You can usually test drive services and you can try and use a service with local or at least relatively close datacenters to get the best speed out of it.  But in the end you need to figure out which data you need NOW and which data you need eventually.  </p> <p>All this applies to downloads of primary data from the cloud, but let’s not forget upload times.  If you are using a backup cloud service one of the biggest issues is going to be bandwidth.  Can you get the backup to the service provider in time to meet your backup window?  Some services can be so slow it may be time to backup again before the last backup has finished.  Check this BEFORE you buy and plan accordingly.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Bandwidth</strong></p> <p>Another aspect of the cloud service impact on network resources is bandwidth cost.  If all you traffic was local before and you now send a good quantity of traffic to and from cloud service providers you could run into some of the performance issues mentioned above.  Some of these will be latency issues that you can’t control and some could just be straight  “size of the pipe” issues with all of the increased traffic.</p> <p>If this is the case you may have to upgrade the size of your network connection to get more bandwidth.  In this case the cost savings of moving your service to the cloud could be offset with the cost of more bandwidth every month to utilize those services.  This math may or may not work out in your favor.  There are often still great savings to be had over running things yourself, however, caution is needed here.  Many cloud projects have been stalled or completely abandoned because nobody checked to see if the office internet connection was up to the task.</p> <p>One final aspect of this is what do you do if you need to get your data back.  If your data is uploaded over years to a cloud service and you need to get it back in a hurry, is this possible?  Do you have the bandwidth to retrieve ALL of your data in a reasonable amount of time?  Would you exceed your bandwidth cap for the month with your ISP?  Would you have anywhere to put it and if you did would that storage space be fast enough to keep up with the bandwidth you do have or would it bottleneck before the bandwidth does? </p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-node--field-blog-tags field-name-field-blog-tags field-type-entity-reference field-label-above"> <div class="field-label">Blog tags</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/71" hreflang="en">bandwidth</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/72" hreflang="en">cloud data</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/58" hreflang="en">blog</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/73" hreflang="en">cloud storage</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/74" hreflang="en">remote storage</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/60" hreflang="en">security</a></div> </div> </div> Fri, 05 Jul 2013 06:19:49 +0000 Sheryl 112 at http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com What to Consider When Moving to the Cloud http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/what-to-consider-when-moving-to-the-cloud <span class="field field-node--title field-name-title field-type-string field-label-hidden">What to Consider When Moving to the Cloud</span> <span class="field field-node--uid field-name-uid field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sheryl</span></span> <span class="field field-node--created field-name-created field-type-created field-label-hidden">Wed, 02/06/2013 - 14:07</span> <div class="clearfix field field-node--body field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><p>Guest post written by Dave W, Network Security Analyst.</p> <p> </p> <p>Whether we like it or not, nearly every online service we consume uses or is moving to “The Cloud”.  This is particularly true of mobile devices.  This can be quite convenient and you might not be aware that you are even using it.  But for businesses and people who are concerned about their data it can be difficult to sort the hype from the reality for these cloud services. </p> <p>To begin with these terms “The Cloud”, “Cloud Computing” or “Cloud Services” are not generally well defined and have become seriously overused buzz words.  I will attempt to disambiguate this for you now because it really is not as complicated as marketing departments seem to want it to be.  Cloud Services refers to any computer resources, be they data storage, data backup, data sharing or other computing resources that are provided to you over the internet, on demand as a service.  These services differ from traditional non-Cloud services only in that you are not providing the computers, software, hard drive space or other resources yourself at your home or office.  This has existed under other names for some time, so if it all sounds familiar it probably is.</p> <p>Some common examples of these would be Dropbox, probably the most well known “Cloud Storage” provider.  IOS device users who use iCloud to backup their photos and other data or Android users who backup their data to Google drive are using “The Cloud” all the time.  </p> <p>I will interject a brief technical point here for those at care about such fine details. These are all examples of public cloud infrastructure.  There are private and hybrid cloud infrastructures as well but unless you’re in a corporate IT department you will not need to worry about that.  And if you are, as much as that topic is near and dear to my heart professionally, sorry but I won’t be getting into that here.</p> <p>Again all this should sound familiar.  These services are becoming ubiquitous.  If you are looking for a to-do list, a notebook or a photo organizer that can be shared between people or between your devices, all this data is being transmitted to and stored on a cloud storage service somewhere on the internet. It is this ubiquitous and nearly invisible use of cloud services that is beginning to give some people pause. </p> <p>This is especially true for small or home businesses.  These are businesses that can make use of these sorts of services but who do not have full-time IT staff to sort out the details and keep things from running away on them.</p> <p>This is not to say that these services are dangerous or should not be used.  Like anything else, they are tools and when used appropriately they are very useful but also need to be understood and respected to avoid certain dangers.</p> <p>So the first question, though there will be others, is about security.  Are these services safe, should I use them, can I trust them for business or personal use?  And of course the answer is “It depends!”  The most accurate and simultaneously annoying answer I could give you.</p> <p>What we always need to look at first when assessing the security of any computing resource it to identify what is being secured and what are the risks to the security of that object.  In this case we are securing your data. If I upload my document to Dropbox I want to know that it is safe.  And this is of course of great concern.  What is as important and often forgotten however is the rest of the information that goes with that.  Namely your Personally Identifiable Information (PII), which could be used to gain access to other data or to impersonate you.</p> <p>What, then, are the risks to your two kinds of data when using Cloud services?  This is not going to be a deep technical in-depth list as there are many attack vectors and more are being found every day.  What we are going to look at are the primary high level risks.</p> <p>The first thing we need to understand is who is getting this data.  If I am handing them my documents, photos, birthdays, email etc., I want to know who these people are.  This can be a huge chore to do exhaustively and most of us are content to go with a name we recognize at least for our personal lives.  For business this becomes a more important task.  At bare minimum this means you want to watch out for downloading random cloud-based apps from the web or an app store, filling in a host of personal information and then uploading your life’s secrets onto the app.  Take some time to do some research.  How big is the company, are there forums or comments online either complaining or praising it, what is its reputation? This is not a fool proof mechanism in and of itself but it is a good start and will weed out the most obvious scams.  Take a look at the website of the service or company involved.  Look for a privacy or security section on their website and see what they do to keep your data safe.  If you are a business or especially if your are paying for the service, it can be worthwhile to contact them and ask questions that you do not find answers to on the website.  Again these things cannot guarantee your data is in safe hands but it will be safer than not checking them out.</p> <p>If you are reasonably happy that this is a legitimate service the question becomes, how safe is my data in their hands?  Even a well-meaning company can have a data breach if they are not careful (and to be honest even if they are careful, but more on that later).</p> <p>Particularly for cloud storage or backup providers it is important to make sure they are taking the appropriate security measures to safeguard your data.  Most will have information on their websites about their secure facilities, never underestimating physical threats, about the way they encrypt or secure their data on disk or about their policies with authentication and access.  These are all-important factors.  Once again, contact the company and ask if you are not sure or have further questions. It pays to do some searching on the web here too.  It can be hard to sift through but again it should help eliminate some services that have clear problems.</p> <p>Of particular concern here is to look at encryption.  Data at rest on any good service should be encrypted either by their service or whereever possible with your own application where you and you alone hold the key and or password.  A little research into the service and some playing around with software like TrueCrypt can make a real difference to the security of your data.  Look into encryption in the application, on the service provider’s website or check about the compatibility of their service with your own third party encryption application.</p> <p>A further factor that is often overlooked is what is called “Data in Flight”.  If you are using any of these services then at some point your data from your device and is copied to the service provider’s location over the public internet.  No matter how secure the data is, once it gets there if it is picked out of the air, literally in the case of WIFI, on its way from you to them then the end security does not mean much.  Fortunately this has a fairly simple fix and is the easiest issue to resolve.  A good cloud-backed application should be communicating with the server over an encrypted protocol.   Most of these services will provide either mandatory or optional SSL communication between you and the service provider.  While this is simple and easy enough to implement, it is difficult especially on mobile devices to verify for yourself.  My suggestion again is to hit up the website for the service, do some web searching or possibly contact the provider and ask.  And even if you find that the application does or can make use of secure communication check the settings carefully.  Some applications will require you to turn this on as an option after it is installed.</p> <p>The idea behind all this data security checkup I am proposing is not to dive into the low level details as these can get overwhelming quite quickly unless you have the security background.  The idea is to ensure that the service provider is concerned about the security of your data and is doing what they can to protect it.  Any provider can have a data leak.  No matter how hard the target, against a sustained, persistent attack even the best security can be breached.  But it is how proactive the provider is in assessing and reacting to these situations that you want to look for. </p> <p>It is here that most people start getting concerned.  Time and again people have told me that they do not put any of their data online because they are afraid that it will “get hacked” and that anything outside their own desktop or laptop is not secure enough. </p> <p>While there are aspects of this that could be argued, a simple point that I return to time and again is this.  I am not an information security expert.  I am storage systems engineer.  While I understand a fair bit of the security game it is certainly not my area of expertise.  A good cloud service provider will have a team of trained experienced professionals that do this all day every day and are better equipped than I am fight off an attack.  The technology used by the good service providers is much better than the security that secures my home network.  And in a world of laptops, USB keys, super phones and tablets, data is more mobile and less physically secure than ever before. </p> <p>This is not to say that you should trust blindly that every Cloud provider’s security is up to snuff.   But is is also important not be overly confident that your home router/firewall will protect your personal data either.  There are many aspects of their security that you need to review and scrutinize before you hand them your data.  But if you are vigilant and do the homework a mixture of well researched cloud services and good home data security measures should provide you with a good balance of security and functionality.</p> <p>Take a look at your mobile devices and the websites you frequent most and take a look at how the data is being used and do some homework.  You might be surprised how much of your data is out there and how little you know about where it is and how it is being stored.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-node--field-blog-tags field-name-field-blog-tags field-type-entity-reference field-label-above"> <div class="field-label">Blog tags</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/58" hreflang="en">blog</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/40" hreflang="en">computer</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/69" hreflang="en">corporate</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/53" hreflang="en">Dropbox</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">email</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/59" hreflang="en">encryption</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/29" hreflang="en">Google</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/24" hreflang="en">marketing</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/67" hreflang="en">mobile</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/60" hreflang="en">security</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">website</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/70" hreflang="en">technology</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 06 Feb 2013 22:07:50 +0000 Sheryl 111 at http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com Do I Need A Mobile Responsive Website? http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/do-i-need-a-mobile-responsive-website <span class="field field-node--title field-name-title field-type-string field-label-hidden">Do I Need A Mobile Responsive Website?</span> <span class="field field-node--uid field-name-uid field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Koji</span></span> <span class="field field-node--created field-name-created field-type-created field-label-hidden">Wed, 10/24/2012 - 14:00</span> <div class="clearfix field field-node--body field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><p>It has become a mobile world.  What does this mean for that website you just refreshed a couple of years ago?</p> <p><strong>Perhaps less than you think...</strong></p> <p>Many years ago, the definition of a mobile site implied a style-stripped site with very minimal markup, and optional image display (Check out the <a href="http://www.google.com/gwt/n">Google Mobilizer project</a>).  In today's web, the mobile target is almost always going to be smartphone and tablet devices. With this in mind, it really depends on the intended usage of your site.  For the majority of small business brochure designs (where contact information and legitimacy is key), your existing style might be just fine. Many designers work with various desktop constraints in mind, as pictured by the <a href="http://browsersize.googlelabs.com/">browser size tool</a> - now <a href="http://analytics.blogspot.ca/2012/06/new-feature-conduct-browser-size.html">in Google Analytics</a>).  </p> <p>With context, these dimensions for optimal desktop visibility are also somewhat compatible for mobile smartphone resolutions, the point being that the key information and navigation of your site can be accomplished without a lot of scrolling around for users with smaller displays. Inherent in the design of all mobile browsers is also pretty decent support for traversing a desktop-centric web space.  Out of the box, just about any mobile browser will cleanly scale down the size of a website such that it will fit nicely in the screen area... and typically, this is just fine for a simple brochure site.</p> <p>At a glance, to check to see roughly how great (or poor) your site looks, check out <a href="http://www.responsinator.com">this tool</a>.</p> <p>Less than perfect?  Check Google Analytics to see if you have a lot of visitors using mobile devices with, then follow <a href="http://bit.ly/Rh4OvY">these directions</a>.</p> <p>Does your site need some mobile work? Be cautious and consider these points:</p> <p><img alt="Snake Oil" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="fc3af9d6-f305-4425-8912-bde3734f48ba" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/snake-oil.png" /></p> <p>Although there are some services and tools that will claim to add responsive (mobile friendly) characteristics to your site like <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magic_(programming)">magic</a>, (or for a few bucks), these tools are not going to apply any usability analysis or design for you, and in some cases may actually frustrate your <strong>mobile</strong> and <strong>desktop</strong> users. Sometimes, if your site is simple enough, these might work out.. but it's important to test this.</p> <p>A properly thought out responsive design <strong>will </strong>and should cost more than a traditional static design.</p> <p>Carefully consider the difference in the mobile and desktop site, particularly with regard to users who might use each platform, and may become confused by the layout differences.</p> <p><strong>LAST but not LEAST</strong> - The purpose of this post is not to denigrate <strong>Responsive Design</strong>. We believe this is an excellent tool, and do recommend it for consideration when a new site is being developed where there is reason to believe that many of the visitors will be mobile. Remember mobile browsers are designed to handle static sites quite well, and just because it is newer and trendy, it is not necessarily the best choice for your business.</p> <p>Feel free to leave your comments below.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-node--field-blog-tags field-name-field-blog-tags field-type-entity-reference field-label-above"> <div class="field-label">Blog tags</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/58" hreflang="en">blog</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/36" hreflang="en">email</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/37" hreflang="en">small business</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/29" hreflang="en">Google</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/66" hreflang="en">menus</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/67" hreflang="en">mobile</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/50" hreflang="en">website programming</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/68" hreflang="en">responsive</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">website</a></div> </div> </div> Wed, 24 Oct 2012 21:00:46 +0000 Koji 110 at http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com 5 Reasons Drupal is Great http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/five-reasons-drupal-is-great <span class="field field-node--title field-name-title field-type-string field-label-hidden">5 Reasons Drupal is Great</span> <span class="field field-node--uid field-name-uid field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sheryl</span></span> <span class="field field-node--created field-name-created field-type-created field-label-hidden">Tue, 07/10/2012 - 14:06</span> <div class="clearfix field field-node--body field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><ol><li>It's free.</li> <li>It's easy to use.</li> <li>Updates are instantaneous.</li> <li>It integrates with social media.</li> <li>It provides tracking.<br /><br /> Drupal uses free and open source tools, which means there is no software to be purchased or licences to update each year.  Using the Drupal CMS (Content Management System) allows the user to easily make changes to their website by creating or editing content, adding pages, posting to a blog or updating photos. Having a content-manageable system is a more immediate means to keep customers informed, encourages staff to take pride in the company’s vision via the website, and makes website changes more cost-efficient.  Drupal allows social media integration in order to send instant updates to platforms such as Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn. Website statistics such as usage or commonly viewed keywords can be tracked over days, months or years.</li> </ol></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-node--field-blog-tags field-name-field-blog-tags field-type-entity-reference field-label-above"> <div class="field-label">Blog tags</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/23" hreflang="en">Content Management</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/61" hreflang="en">CMS</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/14" hreflang="en">Drupal</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/62" hreflang="en">open source</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/63" hreflang="en">social media</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/64" hreflang="en">tools</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/46" hreflang="en">website</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/65" hreflang="en">statistics</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 10 Jul 2012 21:06:10 +0000 Sheryl 109 at http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com Protecting Your DropBox Data on the Go http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/protecting-your-dropbox-data-on-the-go <span class="field field-node--title field-name-title field-type-string field-label-hidden">Protecting Your DropBox Data on the Go</span> <span class="field field-node--uid field-name-uid field-type-entity-reference field-label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/2" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sheryl</span></span> <span class="field field-node--created field-name-created field-type-created field-label-hidden">Tue, 05/22/2012 - 11:51</span> <div class="clearfix field field-node--body field-name-body field-type-text-with-summary field-label-hidden"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><p>Guest post written by Dave W, Network Security Analyst.</p> <p> </p> <p>In <a href="http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/how-protect-your-dropbox-data">my previous post</a>, I talked about how to set up <a href="http://www.truecrypt.org/">TrueCrypt</a> to protect data in DropBox. This post takes that same process and extends it to your Android devices. I am still looking for a similar system for IOS so if you know of a TrueCrypt compatible IOS app, please leave a comment below.</p> <p>The mobile version of this setup requires all the software <a href="http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com/blog/how-protect-your-dropbox-data">in the previous post</a> to setup and configure:</p> <ul><li>A <a href="https://www.dropbox.com/">DropBox </a>account</li> <li>The DropBox client installed and configured</li> <li>The <a href="http://www.truecrypt.org/">TrueCrypt </a>client installed</li> </ul><p>What we are going to do is create a new container with very special parameters that allow it to beopened in an Android app called EDS Lite which plays the part of TrueCrypt on your device since there is no Android port at this time.</p> <p>You will need the following installed on your Android device:</p> <ol><li>DropBox</li> <li>EDS Lite</li> <li>Vi Improved (more about why this is later)</li> </ol><p>You don’t need anything special done to DropBox, just a stock installation.  You don’t need any special setup for EDS Lite either. It is simply going to allow you to open and transfer  files to the encrypted container; install it from the Android Market/Google Play.</p> <p>So why Vi Improved (VIM) ? I like to put a .tc or .eds extension on my containers, though it could be any extension, really. You just want to put something on there so you know what it is later. The problem is that the stock system doesn’t know what to do with files with extensions that it doesn’t understand. So I could put an extension on it that it already understands but some apps might make changes to the file. With VIM installed DropBox seems to try and open things it doesn’t understand in VIM and when it does it doesn’t make any changes to the file so long as you don’t save it. Any app that will allow you to download an arbitrary file out of DropBox without changing it would be fine. This was just what I found worked.</p> <p>With these 3 things installed we can start the process. The key to making this work is creating a TrueCrypt container in a format that EDS Lite understands.</p> <p>What EDS lite expects is a container with the following:</p> <ul><li>Encryption algorithm: AES 256</li> <li>Hash algorithm: SHA-512</li> <li>File system: FAT</li> </ul><p>To create a container for use with EDS Lite AND TrueCrypt we have to use TrueCrypt to create it. The following instructions will walk you through the process.</p> <ol><li>Open TrueCrypt</li> <li>Click “Create Volume”</li> <li>Choose “Create an Encrypted Container” and click Next</li> <li>Choose “Standard TrueCrypt Volume” and click Next</li> <li>Provide a volume name and location that is within the DropBox Directory and click Next</li> <li>Choose “AES” as the Encryption Algorithm</li> <li>Choose “SHA-512” as the Hash Algorithm and click Next</li> <li>Provide a container size that is large enough to hold enough files but small enough for updating on your mobile device; click Next</li> <li>Choose a nice strong password and click Next</li> <li>10. Select “FAT” as the filesystem and follow the instructions labeled “Important” at the bottom.  Then click “Format," and "Exit."</li> </ol><p>Your encrypted container is now created. You should see that DropBox is synchronizing this file up to the server. This can take a while depending on how big a container you created and how good your internet connection is. If you made a big container I suggest you go read something or have a nice meal.</p> <p>Once the container is synced to the server you are ready to start waiting again. We need to get this file downloaded to your Android device. This can take quite a while again. This is why I keep a smaller container for mobile than I do for desktop. The upside is once you download this completely you are really just updating the changes on the device itself, not the whole container. See the end of this post for the downside.</p> <p>To download the container go to your Android device, open DropBox, find the container file and select it. Again you are going to need to go read a book or play a board game or something.</p> <p>Once the container is downloaded it will try and open the file in VIM (or whatever you have found to catch the file). In VIM at the top there is a little button that says “:q!” That will close the file without changing it. Just click that and you should be out of VIM.</p> <p>Now we need to open that container in EDS Lite. Open EDS Lite and follow along with these instructions.</p> <p> </p> <ol><li>Choose the menu button</li> <li>Select “Add Container”</li> <li>You should start at the path “/mnt/sdcard” by default (top left corner)</li> <li>Scroll down and select the folder “Android”</li> <li>Select the folder “Data”</li> <li>Select the folder “com.dropbox.android”</li> <li>Select the folder “files”</li> <li>Select the folder “scratch”</li> <li>Select the container file that you created</li> <li>Press the “Select” button at the bottom</li> <li>You should now be back in the main EDS screen with the container listed</li> <li>Select the container and enter your password</li> </ol><p>The container is now open and ready to add files.</p> <p>The way EDS Lite works you need to add, move and delete files and folders in the app itself. There is no mounted file system like with TrueCrypt on the desktop. I will walk you through the various file operations here. The key though is the interaction with DropBox and this has entirely to do with what you do when you are done modifying the contents of the container so make sure you at least read the last part of the post to get that part.</p> <p>To move files between the container and the devices file systems, use standard cut, copy and paste functionality. If you select the menu button you will see a “Browse Device” button. This button will take you to a view to, surprise surprise, browse the device. If you then open the menu you will see a button to “Browse Container” which is similarly self-evident.</p> <p>To copy a file from your device to the container you select “Browse Device” and browse to particular file or folder. Then:</p> <ol><li>Hold down the file name for a second until a menu pops up to give you various options like cut, copy, delete, rename etc.</li> <li>Select “Copy”</li> <li>Open the menu and select “Browse Container”</li> <li>Navigate to where you want the file or folder placed</li> <li>Open the Menu, select “More” and then select “Paste." The file will now be copied to the container</li> </ol><p>The process to copy a file in the other direction is the same and you can play around with the other options in the menu. Everything is very straightforward.</p> <p>The key thing to note though is that just adding files to the container will not update DropBox. DropBox is looking for the file to be closed before the update happens. To ensure that these files are synced up you need to do three things.</p> <ol><li>Open the menu, select “More” and then select “Exit”</li> <li>Then hold down the name of the container in the list and select “Close container”</li> <li>Open the menu and select “Stop service and exit.”</li> </ol><p>The container is now closed and DropBox should start syncing the file up to the server.</p> <p>Now for the downside to this method. If you are using this process to get files or folders from your desktop or another device, you actually have to go through the download process each time you need to update each device. On the desktop DropBox keeps a copy of all the files locally. On a mobile device with limited data plans and storage space it only downloads the files you specifically open; to update the container on your device you have to download he whole file again. So keep the containers as small as is practical.</p> <p>That is all there is to it. Go out and protect that mobile Android data and please leave a comment if you come up with any tweaks or new uses for this technology.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-node--field-blog-tags field-name-field-blog-tags field-type-entity-reference field-label-above"> <div class="field-label">Blog tags</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/58" hreflang="en">blog</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/59" hreflang="en">encryption</a></div> <div class="field-item"><a href="/taxonomy/term/29" hreflang="en">Google</a></div> </div> </div> Tue, 22 May 2012 18:51:32 +0000 Sheryl 108 at http://www.intellectsolutionsinc.com